McLib TV

I just ran across this video on YouTube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RozYn3Ezbs

This video details how a library in Kentucky has opened a TV branch. They actually create and host library programming on a local cable TV channel several days a week. Wow!!

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Hot Books – Playing at the Library

One of our librarians, Sandy Hudock, thinks we should host a matchmaking night at the library. If you want to meet someone you come and hang out in the call number section of the library that represents your interests. Then you look for someone else with the same interests as yourself. In general, I think the idea of playing in the library is wonderful. Below is an example I read about on Jenny Levine’s blog. It’s for a game they played at the New York Public Library – kind of a combination of tag and hide and seek with a book twist. Check it out.

Come Out and Play Festival » Blog Archive » Hot Books

ACRLog » Blog Archive » Get To Know Your Moblearners

StevenB at ACRLog made the following comment today regarding mobile communication and academic libraries. I thought I’d comment as to our library’s status in this regard. We have primarily received requests for PDA accessible information from our Nursing students. In response, we have purchased a new Dell PDA and are working on adapting our Web pages to be easily viewable on handheld devices.

Future ideas include using IM to conduct reference transactions and further developing our library information and instruction wiki to provide an easily Web accessible resource for students.

My next step will be to create a student advisory group to help guide our efforts. I have created a MySpace and via that, I’ve met several students who like to talk about the library. I would love to hear more from them.
ACRLog » Blog Archive » Get To Know Your Moblearners
I don’t know about you but I am sometimes concerned that academic libraries are, to a significant degree, not ready for moblearners. By that I mean that our resources are far from ready to be used efficiently on the mobile devices that are dominating students’ lives. I know there are a few libraries out there that have experimented with delivering databases to the handheld device, but those seem few and far between. What I would really like to see are more traditional database aggregators developing their products for the small screen so that academic libraries can be a part of the mainstream mobile learning environment. We may also need to do more with texting as a communication channel. I suppose the saving grace of all this change is that there are abundant challenges for academic librarians as we navigate the road to relevancy. Having to adapt to moblearners and much more will keep us from growing complacent.